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Smitten Kitchen Coleslaw

Smitten Kitchen Coleslaw

Enlarge this image Give the author some cabbage and she’ll whip up coleslaw that’s a standout at any summer meal. Deb Perelman for NPR hide caption toggle caption Deb Perelman for NPR Give the author some cabbage and she’ll whip up coleslaw that’s a standout at any summer meal. Deb Perelman for NPR Recipes for blue cheese coleslaw, Napa cabbage and sesame seed slaw, and spicy radicchio slaw with pecans. Readers share their stories.
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Smitten Kitchen Coleslaw

Hi guys, I love this topic since I have been a cole slaw hater for much of my life. Ina Garten’s coleslaw recipe turned me around, it’s mustardy and contains celery seed which gives it a nice herbal note (I shy away from adding sugar into savory recipes, so I omit the sugar and add a heaping of mustard seed to increase the tanginess). I really recommend it if you like a creamier coleslaw. I also prefer to dress my coleslaw right before serving because I need crunchy vegetables, I can’t stand a soggy vegetable. Love the show!
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Smitten Kitchen Coleslaw

skye July 14, 2014 at 5:42 pm Hi guys, I love this topic since I have been a cole slaw hater for much of my life. Ina Garten’s coleslaw recipe turned me around, it’s mustardy and contains celery seed which gives it a nice herbal note (I shy away from adding sugar into savory recipes, so I omit the sugar and add a heaping of mustard seed to increase the tanginess). I really recommend it if you like a creamier coleslaw. I also prefer to dress my coleslaw right before serving because I need crunchy vegetables, I can’t stand a soggy vegetable. Love the show!
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Smitten Kitchen Coleslaw

I have recently found my love for coleslaw, as I too thought I hated it before. There’s a little pub in the next town over that serves terriffic coleslaw along side their incredibly tasty burgers. I was trying to figure out what they used so that I could try to make it at home, and to my surprise, they include shredded green pepper in their slaw. I’d never seen that before. It’s delicious and adds a hint more sweetness.
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Smitten Kitchen Coleslaw

Both the vinegar- and mayonnaise-based varieties of coleslaw appear to have a long history in this country. A recipe in The Sensible Cook: Dutch Foodways in the Old and New World, made by the author’s Dutch landlady in 1770, mixes thin strips of cabbage with melted butter, vinegar and oil. Since mayonnaise was a mid-18th-century invention, coleslaw as we most commonly know it is only about 250 years old.
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Smitten Kitchen Coleslaw

By my own tastings — and hoo boy, have I tested a lot of coleslaw this summer — there are a lot places where modern-day coleslaw can go awry. Often, it is sopped with such a heavy helping of dressing, the cabbage flecks are left to swim in their sauce rather than be mellowed into a cohesive flavor by it. This situation is worsened by Slaw Flaw 2, in which the salad ingredients are left too long in their dressing, and become soggy and limp.
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Smitten Kitchen Coleslaw

Not only did we stop making coleslaw at home, we stopped innovating when we did. Today, you are equally likely to be invited to a Korean, Southwestern or New American-style backyard barbecue. Even the potato salad at these parties will be updated with olives, radishes or curry powder. But we’re still just mulching cabbage and carrots with unseasoned mayo for the coleslaw.
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Smitten Kitchen Coleslaw

Hi Deb, First time on your site (came through the pizza link – very nice advice!) and I saw you had a recent post on coleslaw. I love it too, but you’ve left out what I now consider to be the most important step. I got this from “The Best Recipe” (1st edition) which is from the folks at Cooks Illustrated: you sprinkle the shredded cabbage with sugar or salt and let it weep for a while before you add any other ingredients. My usual coleslaw goes like this (I’m a pediatrician and mom of two, so it has to be fast and easy). I shred the cabbage in the food processor, using the coarse shredding disk (I know, it’s far better to use a knife and get lovely long thin shreds, but I’m in a hurry). I pile the cabbage in a colander and sprinkle it heavily with sugar and a little bit of salt, stirring it a little. If I’m in a big hurry I put a small plate on top and something heavy on that. Then I wait until a good amount of sugary pale green liquid has left and the cabbage has the texture of a good crisp pickle. Usually I shred several carrots and mix them in, and dress it with rice vinegar and roasted peanut oil. You can do whatever you want for dressing and additives, the key thing is to pull moisture from the cabbage before making the slaw. You end up with a slaw that never gets watery and diluted–it tastes just as good three days later. (That’s another time saver–I shred a whole head of cabbage and make a big bowl, then I can take slaw to work as part of my lunch all week.) Sorry to run so long,
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Boyfriend and I had a lovely head of cabbage in our CSA share this week. I’ve always been a coleslaw hater (mostly from memories of cafeteria-style, flavorless, mayonnaise soaked versions), but I had a feeling that I would find a lighter more flavorful version on your site. I was right! This was great. We used greek yogurt in place of the mayo and it was fantastic. I’ll definitely be trying one of your other coleslaw recipes in coming weeks.
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Get ready to expose yourself to that tangy, cold and crunchy meal accompaniment, coleslaw. Shredded, raw and sometimes wilting, we find the perfect balance between green cabbage and red cabbage with a full serving of goat at no extra charge. spilledmilkpodcast.com Recipes Dave Lieberman’s Asian Slaw Coleslaw with Cilantro and Lime Download this episode (MP3)
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bubble July 20, 2014 at 8:48 pm Good podcast! I was a little disappointed you didn’t get some deli coleslaw or that Long John Silver’s coleslaw you mentioned as another to comparison taste. Down here in the South there is the mayonnaise-y slaw and the sweet slaw. I think the sweet slaw is gross but it’s all over the place. Sometimes the vegetables are a tiny confetti all ground up in a food processor. I generally don’t like anybody’s slaw except my Mom’s (I can make it, too, but you know…) She shaves the green cabbage with a knife so it is fine. Normal cabbage, no red. She adds some grated raw onion for taste and raw carrot for color. Then it is mayo, mustard seed, sweet relish (or diced bread n butter pickles), lots of pepper, and a little salt. I sometimes throw in some celery seed. It can be eaten right away but is better if you leave it in the fridge a little while and then stir again. It is still good the next day and still has a little crunch, too. As to the mayo, it is made with the minimum amount that can coat everything after stirring. Of course it moistens up a little in the fridge and you just stir it again. It’s really simple, except that slicing and grating the ingredients is a labor of love!
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Good podcast! I was a little disappointed you didn’t get some deli coleslaw or that Long John Silver’s coleslaw you mentioned as another to comparison taste. Down here in the South there is the mayonnaise-y slaw and the sweet slaw. I think the sweet slaw is gross but it’s all over the place. Sometimes the vegetables are a tiny confetti all ground up in a food processor. I generally don’t like anybody’s slaw except my Mom’s (I can make it, too, but you know…) She shaves the green cabbage with a knife so it is fine. Normal cabbage, no red. She adds some grated raw onion for taste and raw carrot for color. Then it is mayo, mustard seed, sweet relish (or diced bread n butter pickles), lots of pepper, and a little salt. I sometimes throw in some celery seed. It can be eaten right away but is better if you leave it in the fridge a little while and then stir again. It is still good the next day and still has a little crunch, too. As to the mayo, it is made with the minimum amount that can coat everything after stirring. Of course it moistens up a little in the fridge and you just stir it again. It’s really simple, except that slicing and grating the ingredients is a labor of love!
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Loved your interview on NPR! Could you restate the quantity of ingredients you noted for your Pickled Coleslaw? I was in my car driving at the time, and I think you included: 1 cabbage, 1 cucumber, chopped fresh dill, Kosher Salt, sugar & white wine vinegar (just need the amounts). Thanks so much.

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